One way to put a planet/moon in the sky

Skill Level: Intermediate / Views: 923 / System Requirements: Carrara

This is a tutorial designed to show you one possible way to make a "splat" that can be hung in the sky for moons or planets.


Kixum on 9:04PM Wed, 22 September 2010

Part 1, Step 1, Generating the base planet image (Basic Setup)



As discussed in the introduction, this tutorial will cover two basic parts.  The first part is to generate the image of the moon that you want in your sky.  There are a few basic quicky things to do.

1.)  Open up a completely blank empty scene.
2.)  Get rid of all the lights (we're going to put lights back in a few steps).
3.)  Insert a sphere.  Put it at 0,0,0 (X, Y, Z).
4.)  Move the camera that you want for the final render camera to the position shown in the screen capture with the rotation shown.
Note on this step:  A few versions ago, Carrara changed the default camera shape to have those two "film reels" on the top of them.  I don't really know why they did that but I'm guessing it was because users were having a hard time looking at a camera and determining if it was upside down or not (the original shape of the camera was a simple block and cylinder).  Regardless, the "view point" of a Carrara camera is the hotpoint (unless you moved it and if you did, you're going to be messed up).

What we're trying to do here is get the camera to render an image of the sphere facing dead on from a line straight off the center point of the sphere.  So, the view point of the camera needs to be at z = 0 and x = 0.  The Y value has been determined for a specific reason (we'll get to that).

As you can see, I've got four lights in this scene.  They serve specific functions which we will also get too.

5.)  Turn of ambient light in the scene settings!

Tutorial Comments


t-techniker  10:10AM Sat, 15 June 2013

very nice done. I read it, I understand everything. Well represented.

Euxeb007  12:21AM Mon, 20 February 2012

That's what I call a good tutorial ;o)

ptsulli  3:00PM Thu, 06 January 2011

Kixum; great tut, I'm going to have to try some variations, but an altogether straight forward presentation. Thanks