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Taschen-Computer

MarkHirst
Member Since Nov 20, 2001
192 Images, Last upload Aug 10, 2014

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Karl Wolmark, you have two messages in your inbox...

[MESSAGE 1]

Thank you for giving me this unique opportunity.

I am intrigued as to how you came about such an item, but I understand the need for secrecy in this matter.

I can summarise my findings as follows.

The vehicle is 40 metres long by 9 metres wide.

With the exception of a set of doors mounted centrally, there are no openings anywhere on the surface, or any engine exhaust or thruster ports. At this stage, we believe that the ship must use antigravity propulsion to take off, much like our own ships. How it manoeuvres in deep space, we do not know.

You will see that we have had to place the ship on hydraulic rams as it appears to have no landing gear. Its unusual and impractical shape means it cannot be set on the ground without support.

The ship is comprised of a blue metallic material with some substructures and cosmetic detailing in white silver. The final construction detail is a singular red section at the nose.

The material is proving difficult to analyse. It shows many of the characteristics of the heavy transition metals such as Tantalum, Osmium, Tungsten and Rhenium. It appears to be much denser and immensely tougher however, and even resists chemical attack from acids. Our hardest drills have been blunted by it. We are speculating that the Lazloi may have exploited a phenomena known as lanthanide contraction, or that the material is suffused with force fields, or underwent an artificial re-alignment of the lattice structure.

Our ultrasound measurements suggest a hull thickness of about one metre, but tell us very little about the internal structure. The immense weight of such a small vessel suggests that much of the interior is comprised of mechanisms and not living space.

Power signatures are minimal to non-existent. Electrical activity is also minimal, but was seen to change markedly when the prisoner was first brought to the storage area.

This is the first evidence we have that the ship reacts to changes in its environment. In spite of her substandard education and language skills, I recommend that the prisoner not be liquidated at this time until her connection with the artefact is established.

We will continue to tackle the entrance doors with cutting equipment, but may have to consider explosives or powerful lasers if these prove ineffective.

p.s. Doctor Almeda wishes to start an autopsy but tells me his requests for the Lazloi body have been ignored. Please advise.

-- Dr Neuerman

[MESSAGE 2]

Sir, I have to report an incident for which Security is entirely to blame. I can assure you that if they were performing their duties correctly, this would not have happened.

As I mentioned in my previous message, the ship reacts to the presence of the prisoner and for this reason, we have brought her into the test chamber on a number of occasions.

Today, the prisoner was left unattended by the guard assigned to her. She was able to wander about unsupervised and into close proximity of the Lazloi ship.

My staff were preoccupied with the new readings emanating from the ship and did not notice an access lift descending from the Lazloi craft till it was too late.

I'm sure the prisoner was as surprised as we were, but had the presence of mind to leap into the open door. Although one of guards opened fire and thinks he may have hit the prisoner, the door closed and the lift retracted into the belly of the craft.

I need not remind you of the extraordinary properties of the blue metal used to build the ship. Our efforts to attack the door where the lift emerged have been completely fruitless.

The ship appears to be partially operational, and could be an even greater danger no doubt with the prisoner potentially in control.

I have evacuated my staff from the hangar and await your instructions.

-- Dr Neuerman

Made in Hexagon 1 and textured in Photoshop CS2. Rendered in Vue Pro Studio 5
Details
Uploaded
December 19, 2007
Gallery
Vue
Genre
Science Fiction
Size
99.2 kB
Dimensions
1024x435

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Image Comments


Dec 19, 2007 2:16:40 pm
Die Texturen für die Bildschirme sind sehr fein. Hätte gerne so ein Ding ;)

by DiaryOfDreams Homepage »

Dec 19, 2007 2:21:43 pm
There wasn't enough space to add these final comments ....

Taschen Computer is German for pocket computer. A micro-hobby of mine is handheld computers from the late 80's and early 90's. My favourites are the Sharp PC-1600 and the Texas Instruments CC-40, relics from a simpler time...

Happy Xmas!

by MarkHirst Homepage »

Dec 19, 2007 4:13:06 pm
Nice work - and an elegant design. It is interesting how this scale is so much smaller than the behemoth ships you've done in the past.

by duncanlong Homepage »

Dec 19, 2007 4:34:31 pm
Nice design!

by TheBear005 Homepage »

Dec 19, 2007 9:01:48 pm
This is a VERY nice design, and I really like the simplicity of the render. You really let the design of the model speak for itself. I think one of the things that makes it so convincing are the icons and screen designs. You know, I'm really impressed by the softness and realism of the shadows -- very well done. If I were to suggest anything, it might be to add some small details like a thin ring of chrome around the screens, or to slightly change the color of the buttons so they have a little more contrast. Maybe a seam on the side might help increase the realism factor? Of course, I'm just nitpicking -- I'm very impressed with this. Well done!

by mmitchell_houston Homepage »

Dec 19, 2007 11:27:15 pm
Not to mention an absolutely intriguing story-line! Well done, Mark! Hope your holidays are all that you could wish them to be.

by kjer_99 Homepage »

Dec 20, 2007 4:32:05 am
Very Nice Piece of Model Work!!!

by Thelby Homepage »

Dec 20, 2007 8:36:38 am
Superb story to accompany the image.

by drace68 Homepage »

Dec 20, 2007 10:27:33 am
Clever - enjoying the story and it is a fine image.

by Mikeall Homepage »

Dec 20, 2007 11:57:39 pm
I myself find that these scenes are a bit more rewarding to achieve design wise ! out of the norm for you but very well rendered .

by Odessey Homepage »

Dec 21, 2007 8:23:54 am
An elegant design, if a bit primitive by Third Imperium standards. The symbols clearly point to a Terracentric TL-8 (pre-stellar) society. Interesting to consider they may still be using something as quaint as email in the 57th Century (or later)!

Well designed and rendered, Mark -- and Greetings of the Season!

by Denger Homepage »

Dec 24, 2007 10:26:28 am
Impressively creative. The messages are a lot more literate than the ones I often get, too!

by bluehermit Homepage »

Dec 26, 2007 11:38:23 am
Fantastic work!!

by PoserHobbit Homepage »

Mar 7, 2008 3:50:37 pm
HaHa! Those a-holes are gonna get it now. I hope she gets in there and starts pressing buttons.

by Tom-Noddy Homepage »

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